CO2 and O2 Respiratory Gas Analyzer with Calibration Kit

SKU GA-200
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Product Details

The GA-200 CO2 and O2 Gas Analyzer provides a 10 millisecond response time which allows measurement of changes in respiratory gas concentrations. The GA-200 uses laser diode absorption technology to measure oxygen concentrations from 0-100%, and infrared detection to measure carbon dioxide concentrations from 0 to 13%.

The GA-200 has a fluorescent display for programming the unit and observing measurements, a keypad for programming the unit’s operation and calibration, and analog outputs that allow the unit to be easily connected to the IX-214 data recording unit.

Citations

  • Moore, Charles P., et al. "Correlation of high flow nasal cannula outlet area with gas clearance and pressure in adult upper airway replicas." Clinical Biomechanics (2017).
  • Merritt, Kristen J., Caroline E. Raburn, and Jesse C. Dean. "Adaptation of the preferred human bouncing pattern toward the metabolically optimal frequency." Journal of neurophysiology 107.8 (2012): 2244-2249.
  • Bowtell, Joanna L., et al. "Acute physiological and performance responses to repeated sprints in varying degrees of hypoxia." Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 17.4 (2014): 399-403.
  • Gómez, Jaime Vásquez, et al. "DESEMPEÑO EN UNA PRUEBA DE CAMINATA Y UNA PRUEBA INCREMENTAL EN ESTUDIANTES DE EDUCACIÓN FÍSICA: FRECUENCIA CARDÍACA DE RECUPERACIÓN Y VO2 MÁX." Revista Ciencias de la Actividad Física UCM. N 16.2 (2015): 57-69.
  • Gravelle, Brent L., and Ted W. Hagen II. "Metabolic characteristics of Appalachian children." Clinical Nutrition ESPEN (2017).
  • Dutta, Rabijit, et al. "Comparison of flow and gas washout characteristics between pressure control and high-frequency percussive ventilation using a test lung." Physiological measurement 39.3 (2018): 035001.
  • Dutta, Rabijit, Tao Xing, and Gordon K. Murdoch. "Comparison of pressure, volume and gas washout characteristics between PCV and HFPV in healthy and formalin fixed ex vivo porcine lungs." Physiological measurement 39.9 (2018): 095003.
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